How to Start a Makerspace

two students sitting in the art area of the Earl Center working with glue guns and pipe cleanersIt is not unusual for a library to contemplate creating a makerspace. In fact, most of them have been doing it for years in the service of children’s programming. All of the crafts and story-time and Lego contests would fit comfortably into any makerspace. Even adult programming can fit the bill when local artists or craftspeople come and talk about their work. Of course the genius of makerspace is that it is ideally experiential and allows the people participating to learn something new. This is all without the formal designation of being a “class”. The people who guide makerspace activities are not necessarily experts in whatever they are facilitating. One of the strengths of the movement is that all participants can co-facilitate. “I don’t know how it works—let’s figure it out” is the guiding phrase and one that empowers everyone and invites them to play.

How do I find out about…

Even without a dedicated facilitator, a makerspace can function using the masses of information available over the internet and an adventurous spirit. It’s often just enough to get you started. Access to an educational resource such as Lynda.com can be a plus. But websites like YouTube and Instructables.com also have a plethora of materials to guide the exploration of a new activity. There is a website called makeitatyourlibrary.org that lets you search for a project suitable for a library makerspace by time, skill level, cost and other factors.  Makercamp.com has daily and weekly projects and the blog of the Duxbury Public Library makerspace has some great in-depth tips for possible activities as well as practical examples of how to catalog kits you might develop. Another source for education and inspiration are the MOOC type resources such as EdX and Coursera which provide classes on innumerable topics for free. The information covered there is constructed more as a traditional online class but it can be a good way to gain more in-depth knowledge of a topic without a tremendous commitment or need to get out of your pajamas. The guiding principal is not being afraid to fail. Failure is part of the process and is to be welcomed as part of the learning process.

Where can I go?

In Eastern Massachusetts we have a growing number of makerspaces and hackerspaces (another way of referring to them). Libraries that have already developed them are great places to start to get ideas of what might be possible in your library and get to know the library makerspace community..

And, of course, the Earl Center is always good for an opinion or some suggestions.

A recent visit to the Hatch Makerspace of the Watertown Public Library yielded an enthusiastic environment with a mostly volunteer staff dedicated to sharing their passions with the public. The staffing model demonstrated that the people there at that particular time were experts in their areas of passion– one in fiber arts—who helped a woman new to sewing successfully make an apron; the other a jeweler and expert in the laser/CNC cutting machine, making wooden jewelry. While both had a working knowledge of the other activities possible they did not feel compelled to “know it all” and were fine referring our questions to the dates and times that people imbued with those passions would be available.

Funding one’s makerspace

Funding for makerspaces has been growing as interest and application to educational activities such as STEM and STEAM have grown. In the former presidential administration there was a very active push to make opportunities for these areas to grow because of the connection to industry and the future of jobs. The White House held annual STEM conferences on the White House Lawn for the last two years. It remains that the skills that can be learned through makerspace activities and STEM activities will continue to be very important to the future economic growth of the country. In Massachusetts the Board of Library Commissioners has been active in promoting LSTA (Library Services and Construction Act) grants both targeting STEAM (STEM with Art added) and providing an opportunity to spin a unique grant. These grants provide a way in for libraries to learn about writing grants and funds and support to get new programs off the ground as well as getting a makerspace up and running.

Resources

Software from the Autodesk company

Makerspace supply list

Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners – LSTA Grants

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