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online tools

Screenshot of ejournal finder search results, with the Search within Publication highlighted

New eJournal Finder and a Google Scholar update

The Library has a new and enhanced eJournal Finder!  If you haven’t used the eJournal Finder before, it is a tool that helps you find Wheelock subscriptions to journals and the articles within them.  The new Finder looks a little different, but the functionality will remain very familiar, with additional improvements over the previous one.   You can access it through the Library homepage by going to the eJournal Finder tab.

screenshot of ejournal finder tab

Try searching for Journal of Social Work Education.  In your Search Results, you can go to one of the databases where full text is available for this journal.  For many of the journals, you can search within that journal.

Screenshot of ejournal finder search results, with the Search within Publication highlighted

The Search within Publication  feature is incredibly handy.  You can put in something as general as the term, “elementary schools” to find Journal of Social Work Education articles related to “elementary schools”.   You can also search for a specific article title, like “MSW students’ attitudes toward transracial adoption”.  This saves you several steps over the previous eJournal finder.  Here is what you will immediately get when you run this second search:

results from an article title search using the eJournal Finder's Search Within Publication feature. Two results.

This new eJournal Finder means you will also have to update your Google Scholar library links.  For those who don’t know what Google Scholar’s library links do: it finds full text from Wheelock subscriptions in your Google Scholar results.

first Google Scholar search results

Go to scholar.google.com and select Settings.

Google Scholar homepage with a red box around the Settings link

On the next page, select Library Links.

 

Google scholar settings page with Library Links highlighted

Under Library Links, search for Wheelock.  Select everything that says Wheelock.

Google Scholar library links page with all 4 current options selected

Please let us know if you have questions!  You can come see us, email us at library@wheelock.edu, call us at 617-879-2220, or chat us via the Library website.

 


Images in a developing online collection.

Introducing the Online Learning Lab

An exciting new technology is coming to your classroom! Last week, the Smithsonian Institution launched their new Online Learning Lab. The Lab gives anyone access to the Smithsonian’s digital collections, including millions of digitized images, videos, artifacts, and documents. Following the Lab’s “discover, create, share” model, items in the collections can be organized, annotated, and remixed according to your imagination. Have a topic you’re interested in? Create a collection for yourself or to share with friends, like the one I created about my home-sweet-home: Nevada.

Images in a developing online collection.

Creating my collection in the Smithsonian’s Online Learning Lab.

While it’s a fun tool for exploring personal interests, the Online Learning Lab was created for teachers with the help of teachers and is intended to be used in K-12 as well as higher education classrooms. You can use the Lab to give students access to customized collections, including your original annotations, quizzes, and assignments. Students can also create their own collections, making this the perfect tool for a digital exhibit assignment. And even as you add your own annotations and titles, you won’t lose or overwrite the Smithsonian’s excellent metadata so you don’t have to worry about endangering the knowledge of one of our nation’s most venerable institutions.

The Smithsonian is presenting the Online Learning Lab this week at the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) conference. Even if you weren’t able to make it to Denver for the conference, you can still get started with this incredibly fun and easy tool. So, what are you waiting for? Your class could be on the cutting edge.


Social work students: Meet your new best friend!

Looking for trustworthy scholarly information in social work? Try the Encyclopedia of Social Work! Articles are written by experts and updated regularly, and they cover major areas of social work theory, research, policy, and practice. Here are just a few of the 400 articles you’ll find:

  • Alcohol and Drug Problems: Practice Interventions
  • Ecological Framework
  • Domestic Violence in the LGBT Community
  • Kinship Care
  • Intersectionality and Social Work
  • Welfare Rights

These articles would satisfy Goldilocks, if she were a social work student: they’re neither too deep nor too shallow, but just right.  Each provides a meaningful overview of a topic, and links to additional readings where you can learn more.

And best of all? The Encyclopedia of Social Work is free to you, courtesy of the Wheelock College Library.  This online resource is 100% available to all Wheelock College faculty, staff, and students:  no matter if you are in Boston or Worcester, in the BSW or MSW program, or are studying in a related field.

Check it out today!  You can access the Encyclopedia of Social Work here; from the Social Work research guide; or from the A to Z list of databases on the library website.

Image linked to the Encyclopedia of Social Work website.


Get research help over spring break!

Spring break is upon us!  Are you visiting a beautiful location? Are you working hard on a research paper?  Are you working hard on your research in a beautiful location?

In any case, the library has got you covered.  Librarians are standing by to help you to focus your topic, investigate excellent sources, and use citation styles like APA, MLA, and Chicago.  Get research help in person or remotely over spring break!  Check out our spring break hours here.

 


Getting started with research: Finding background information

So, you’ve just been assigned a research paper or project? If you’re like most people, you’re next step is to do some pre-research on your topic. After all, you want to get a sense of what it’s all about before you commit. You probably search Google and maybe read a Wikipedia article or two. The purpose of this is to gather background information and explore your topic before settling on a focused research question. But while Google and Wikipedia are handy tools, you might find yourself questioning the credibility of some of the information you find online or maybe your professor requires you to use scholarly sources. Where should you turn? To the library, of course!

CredoHome

Try a basic keyword search on your topic or browse books by subject.

The library has many print and digital resources to help you find background information. We often call these “reference sources.” One of my favorite reference sources is Credo Reference. Credo includes more than 800 unique reference titles and nearly 4 million full-text articles across a variety of subjects, making it a great place to start your research for almost any assignment.

You can access Credo Reference from the library homepage by selecting the “Databases A-Z” tab in the main search bar and selecting “Credo Reference (reference)” from the drop down menu. If you’re off campus, you will be prompted to login with your Wheelock username and password. Once you’re in Credo, you can do a basic search of your topic or browse books by subject. When you see something that looks interesting, click on the article title to read the article or email it to yourself for later. Don’t forget to grab a pre-formatted citation to get a head start on your works cited page!

CredoArticle

Don’t forget to email the article to yourself and grab the citation.

 

And remember that the library offers drop-in research help 7 days a week, from noon until close. We can help you get started with your research in Credo or any of the library’s databases.