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Wheelock College Library

image of Tracy Joyce

Introducing: Tracy Joyce

image of Tracy JoyceA long overdue introduction to Tracy Joyce, who started at the Wheelock College Library in early February.  Many of you have probably already met her in your research workshops, at the Library Service Desk, and at various Wheelock College functions. 

Name: Tracy Joyce

Job title: Learning & Research Services Librarian, and Liaison to the School of Graduate and Professional Programs

Location in Library: Floor 2, Office 201

Tell us what you do in 50 words or less:

My job is to help make research less daunting. I can help with formulating your topic to finding and evaluating sources to understanding when and how to cite. I also create research guides, select library materials, and work with faculty to integrate information literacy and research instruction into courses.

Choose one service that your department provides that you most want the Wheelock community to be aware of:

Research appointments! Students can schedule a research appointment with myself or Karen to get one-on-one help. Students typically schedule appointments when they need help finding sources. However, we can also work with students when they are at different stages of their research, which might include narrowing down a topic, creating a research question, developing keywords/search terms, or using tools and sources to create citations.

What is a typical work day like for you?

My job covers a wide range of areas but a typical day probably includes some combination of the following: providing drop-in research help at the front desk, meeting with students for individual research appointments, selecting materials to add to the library collection, planning and teaching research workshops, and collaborating with faculty to provide research and resource support.

What is your favorite website?

Every morning when I check my email I also am on the lookout for my newsletter from theskimm.com. This site compiles the latest headlines so that I can stay current when it comes to the news and events.

What is your favorite book in the Wheelock Library collection?

Matilda by Roald Dahl. He was one of my favorite author’s to read when I was younger, and I still remember the book report I wrote in elementary school.

When I’m not at work, you can find me…

Walking by Horn Pond in Woburn or Lake Quannapowitt in Wakefield, painting either at home or at a Paint Nite, reading, or spending way too much time binge watching shows.


picture of Karen Storz. Greenery and a body of water in the background.

Introducing: Karen Storz

picture of Karen Storz. Greenery and a body of water in the background. An overdue introduction to Karen Storz, who joined our Library earlier this semester!  You’ve probably already met her in your research workshops, at the Service Desk, and at various Wheelock events. 

Name: Karen Storz

Job title: Learning & Research Services Librarian, and Liaison to the School of Arts and Sciences

Location in Library: Floor 2, Office 201

Tell us what you do in 50 words or less:

I’m here to help at any stage of the research process, from formulating your topic to finding and evaluating sources to understanding when and how to cite. I also create research guides, select library materials to support the curriculum, and work with faculty to integrate information literacy and research instruction into courses.

Choose one service that your department provides that you most want the Wheelock community to be aware of:

We offer research help and consultation services to faculty as well! As you develop syllabi and research assignments, we can help you find and integrate relevant books, articles, and videos available through the library. We can also work with you on ways to structure assignments that involve library and internet research, and we can provide tailored research instruction through class visits, library workshops, video tutorials, and one-on-one appointments. For your own research, we are always happy to help you track down hard-to-find sources, walk you through advanced databases features, or alert you to new resources in your field. Get in touch and let us know how we can help!

What is a typical work day like for you?

There’s a lot of variety in my job, but a typical day probably includes some combination of the following: providing drop-in research help at the front desk, meeting with students for individual research appointments, selecting materials to add to the library collection, planning and teaching research workshops, and collaborating with faculty to provide research and resource support.

What is your favorite website?

I recently discovered the very cool Radio Garden, where you can explore live radio from around the world by moving your cursor across the globe like a big radio dial, tuning in to thousands of stations from Boston to Botswana to Beijing. I love dipping in and out of so many different languages and musical styles.

What is your favorite book in the Wheelock Library collection?

I don’t have one favorite, but I recently read and loved Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi, a lyrical and heartrending novel that begins in 18th-century Ghana and traces the diverging and converging stories of two half-sisters and their descendants through 300 years of Ghanaian and American history. I was amazed that this was Gyasi’s first novel, given its epic sweep and narrative complexity.

When I’m not at work, you can find me…

Spending time with family and friends, reading, cooking, digging in our tiny vegetable garden, hanging out at Symphony Hall or the MFA, browsing flea markets or estate sales for interesting paper ephemera, and increasingly, writing to my political representatives.


woman with blondish hair and glasses.

Introducing: Rachel Gravel

A long overdue introduction to Rachel Gravel, Access Services Librarian!

Name: Rachel Gravelimage of Rachel Gravel, a woman with brownish blond hair and glasses.

Job title: Access Services Librarian

Location in Library: Floor 1M

Tell us what you do in 50 words or less:

I make library resources available to the Wheelock community. That means I oversee library circulation, interlibrary loan and course reserves, and help to promote these services. I also supervise library student workers, provide research help at the service desk and collaborate with the other librarians to make sure we’re providing our patrons with the best resources and services we can.

Choose one service that your department provides that you most want the Wheelock community to be aware of:

Interlibrary loan! ILL is a fabulous way for libraries to get ahold of materials we don’t have and put them into the hands of our patrons. Because we can’t buy every book, journal, film or album ever created, resource sharing among libraries is a real advantage to smaller institutions like us. If there’s something you want and we don’t have it, don’t give up! We’re happy to show you how to place ILL requests to help you get want you need from another library.

What is a typical work day like for you?

On a given day, you might find me processing ILL requests, setting up course reserves, helping patrons with research or printing or locating resources, developing plans for new library services, promoting a library happening, selecting materials to add to the collection, mentoring our student workers and pre-professional staff or catching up with professional development opportunities and readings (because after all, librarianship is a lifelong learning profession). No two days are exactly alike and that’s what keeps me coming back!

What is your favorite website?

Every morning I make the news rounds online to my favorites: npr.org, nytimes.com, and boston.com. More interestingly, I like scary stories and recently discovered creepypasta!

What is your favorite book in the Wheelock Library collection?

Pretty much anything in the 830s (German literature).

When I’m not at work, you can find me…

Spending time with friends, reading, cooking, crafting or watching sci-fi flicks/shows.


Introducing: Allison Smith

Image of Allison SmithName: Allison Smith

Job title:  Acquisitions & Administrative Assistant

Location in Library: Floor 2

Tell us what you do in 50 words or less:

I manage serials collections and administrative and financial support services for Academic Resources.

Choose one service that your department provides that you most want the Wheelock community to be aware of:

If you think there is something we ought to have in our collection let us know!

What is a typical work day like for you?

I’m generally processing serials, ordering and receiving books, and giving directions to lost students since my desk is right by the stairwell.

What is your favorite website?

Probably MotherJones.  I’m also on Goodreads a lot (unsurprisingly).

What is your favorite book in the Wheelock Library collection?

One of my recent favorites is Romantic Outlaws: The Extraordinary Lives of Mary Wollstonecraft and Her Daughter Mary Shelley by Charlotte Gordon.

When I’m not at work, you can find me…

at one of my 2 other library jobs or over at Simmons where I’m studying for my MLS


Being An Ally

This is the fourth installment of the Wheelock Community Read Summer Blog Series. Each week, we will be posting a blog written by Wheelock faculty or staff that deals with a theme from this years’ community read; “The Beautiful Struggle” by Ta-Nehisi Coates. This week, please welcome guest blogger Greg Cass, Assistant Professor of Humanities and Writing.  

Being an Ally

by Greg Cass

It’s been a hard summer.  While I was in the middle of reading The Beautiful Struggle, we all bore witness to the continued violence against individuals of color around the country. In Louisiana, Alton Sterling was shot while being wrestled to the ground by police. In Minnesota, Philando Castile was shot during a traffic stop after declaring a handgun he was permitted to carry. In both cases, grainy cell phone videos recorded the moments, and in their looped repetition on cable news they moved slowly from shocking to familiar, and my response softened from outrage to submission. Two more black lives lost; two more reasons for us all to retreat to our political corners and tweet angrily about the other side. These events feel inevitable, and they’re too quickly becoming forgettable.

Often times after one of these incidents occur, I see a common trend in the Facebook posts many of my well-intentioned friends and family members make in response: whitesplaining. These posts often express sympathy, but note that the victim of the violence is responsible for what has happened to him. In their view, if the violence was not deserved, there were at least two or three precipitating choices for which the victim can be blamed. In the more innocent form, this could be a note that there was clearly a reason for the police presence or the traffic stop, and in an extreme form I’ve seen this smug Willy Wonka meme. While my response to these is always anger, I know that these responses represent a limited perspective, one that doesn’t recognize the privileged position from which they speak.

But I could never hope to articulate this as well as Ta-Nehisi Coates does. Late in his memoir, he talks directly to those who like to preach solutions to the violence faced by black youth. His words reflect righteous anger toward those that ignore truth in favor of privilege:

Nowadays I cut on the tube and see the dumbfounded looks, when over some minor violation of name and respect, a black boy is found leaking on the street. The anchors shake their heads. The activists give their stupid speeches, praising the mythical days when all disputes were handled down at Ray’s Gym. Politicians step up to the mic, claim the young have gone mad, their brains infected, and turned superpredator. Fuck you all who’ve ever spoken so foolishly, who’ve opened your mouths like we don’t know what this is. We have read the books you own, the scorecards you keep—done the math and emerged prophetic. We know how we will die—with cousins in double murder suicides, in wars that are a mere theory to you, convalescing in hospitals, slowly choked out by angina and cholesterol. We are the walking lowest rung, and all that stands between us and beast, between us and the local zoo, is respect, the respect you take as natural as sugar and shit. We know what we are, that we walk like we are not long for this world that this world has never longed for us.

When I first read this passage, I saw myself in it. As a concerned outsider, I know I’ve often been quick to judge young black men and the violence they inflict upon each other without ever having walked in their shoes. I take the aerial view, and Coates knows it. He sees no value in my head shaking, and no value in me telling others how they ought to live their lives. I know the academic reasons behind “the walking lowest rung,” but I should not mistake that for the right to be condescending.

So these are the two dynamics laid bare by Coates throughout his book: there is real suffering and real violence that is stealing the lives and potential of black men, but the last thing they need is another voice telling them why they suffer or telling them how to act. For me, this then begs two questions: How can we outsiders be allies in these times? If The Beautiful Struggle inspires empathy and understanding in us, what can we do to advance the cause?

These are hard questions, and when facing them, I think many of us with privilege get paralyzed by the thought of doing something wrong, or insulting someone, and use that fear as an excuse to do nothing. We leave the fight to others and assume the work will get done without us. But there is a better way. We can and should see institutional racism and violence committed against our fellow citizens, regardless of its source, as an attack on ourselves. If you, like me, are moved to action by this book, I want to share with you the best tips I have found for being an ally. This list is not definitive or universal, but I have found these steps to be the most valuable in my own fight for social justice.

1.) Talk less; listen more.

Look again at the quote from Coates above. His anger is clearly focused on those who try to speak over the voices of others. His frustration is focused on the speech acts of those who don’t understand his world, the activists with “stupid speeches,” the politicians who “step up to the mic,” and “all who’ve ever spoken so foolishly.” When those of us with privilege use it to paternalistically speak over the voices of those without it, we are reenacting the violence, reminding them again that we set the terms, and we hold the power.

This is wrong. The first step is to be present in the conversation, to engage and think, but most of all, to listen. Our nation’s history has continually stifled non-white non-male voices, so the best way to fight for social justice is to first hear what that injustice is from someone who experiences it daily. This can be hard, because fighting for social justice feels like it needs to be active, and not passive; it is a fight, right? But you are not the speaker; you are not the soapbox. You are the amplifier, and the goal is to make sure others are heard first.

2.) Read. Read. Read.

Challenge yourself to move outside of your comfort zone in the relative safety of the written word. If Coates’s book has expanded your understanding, keep seeking knowledge. Racism and inequality have deep roots in this country that most standard educations only scratch the surface of. With the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement, there was a popular meme that I saw originally on twitter that read “White privilege is your history being part of the core curriculum and mine being taught as an elective.” Through no fault of our own, this institutional bias has created huge gaps in our understanding of anyone who falls outside of that privileged history. Correct it.

Read about the present. Read about the past. Read about people who aren’t like you. Coates can get you started with 13 books to better understand the experience of Black Americans. But if books aren’t your ideal source, get online. Seek out diverse voices across all media and learn from what they have to say. Challenge your opinions. Challenge the opinions of others. We can’t fight an enemy that we don’t understand, and the complexities of racism in this country will always prove elusive if we don’t study them.

3.) Recognize your privilege.

Before the traffic stop that proved fatal, Philando Castile had been stopped 49 times over the course of 13 years. The reasons for these stops varied, but most were for minor infractions, such as a burnt out tail light. As a white middle-class male, I never worry that a traffic stop could end my life. I would never think that walking on any street or in any neighborhood would put my body in danger. This was the lucky hand I was dealt at birth, and while I have every right to enjoy these luxuries, I have to remain conscious that those privileges exist and that I benefit from them.

Holding privilege is not an inherently bad thing, nor is it a reason to feel ashamed of yourself or where you come from. It also doesn’t mean you’ve had an easy life, or that you haven’t worked hard for the comfort you have. No one is asking for you to feel that way. But, if you aren’t honest with yourself about the advantages you’ve had because of your race, class, religion, ethnicity, gender, or sexual orientation, you’ll never be able to advance the work of sharing those benefits with everyone.

4.) Don’t give up. Don’t disengage. Don’t forget.

Social justice is hard work. It’s not a field to enter expecting fast results or quick satisfaction. The day-to-day events and continued violence can easily break one’s will to continue. There are many more causes; there are many easier fights; TV is REALLY good right now. But this is a fight that matters, and to be a good ally is to recognize that this is not a fight others can choose to ignore. Lucy Wheelock told us that the fight for children and families requires that we “be brave, for there is much to dare.” This fight requires bravery, and to dare to dream of a nation defined by equality is a long-term commitment.

President Obama is fond of quoting a line from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., reminding all of us that “The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends towards justice.” This is truth. We stand at a point along the curve, unsure of where exactly it began and unclear of how far it goes beyond us. But to be a good citizen is to know deeply that the fortunes of one affect the fortunes of all, to see how our institutions perpetuate values we reject, and to work doggedly to effect real change. Only in a true understanding of this can we attain an authentic and abiding empathy that empowers us all.