Celebrate with Poetry!

 

This April is a time to CELEBRATE! This month marks the inauguration of Wheelock’s President David Chard as well as National Poetry Month! In honor of these two exciting occasions, the library has set up two poetry activities!

Get in touch with your creative side and partake in our Poet-Tree activity. Create your own blackout poem on leaves cut from old book pages, and then add them to the Poet-Tree for all to see! Below are photos of just how quickly the tree has grown!

Our Spine Poetry station challenges students to create poems out of found words on book spines. Us librarians have pulled a cart of books for you to start with, but if you’re looking for inspiration feel free to browse the shelves and grab any other words that jump out at you. Below are some of our favorite creations so far!

There’s still plenty of time to stop by the library and add to the Poet-Tree or Spine Poems. These activities will be up through the end of the semester! Be sure to share your works with the Wheelock community by posting them online! #WheeRead #WheelockCollege


covers of the 12 social work books listed below

Social Work Month

There aren’t many schools in which social work is such a core part of its identity.  At Wheelock, the college’s mission and motto – ” to improve the lives of children and families”- is a very familiar mission for social workers.  Unsurprisingly, social work is one of our most popular majors.  Besides our MSW in Social Work, we also have several social work graduate certificate programs.

March is Social Work Month.  The month is set aside to celebrate the invaluable and compassionate work that social workers do to make a positive difference in the lives of individuals and families.  In recognition, I’ve compiled a list of some of our Library’s recent books related to social work:

covers of the 12 social work books listed below

 


covers of next 4 books on list

History Diet for Growing Kids

Carter G. Woodson who started what later evolved to be Black History Month once said “if a race has no history, it has no worthwhile tradition, it becomes a negligible factor in the thought of the world, and it stands in danger of being exterminated”.

It seems fairly straightforward to record that history, spotlight it, and teach it so that it becomes a part of our consciousness.    Unfortunately, history is pretty complicated.   History doesn’t have an immutable existence and there can be multiple perspectives, developing in light of new information (both true and false) and cultural shifts.  History can be vulnerable to bias, rewriting, and to being lost altogether.

It is often the case that students learn a “set narrative” (see Michael Conway’s article, “The Problem with History Classes”) and students often come away with what they end up believing to be the only narrative and a list of bullet points to slog through and memorize.  In the US, struggles, accomplishments, and the role minority populations play in the building of the US are condensed into a handful of bullet points.  And things that aren’t on the list are relegated to insignificance and obscurity.

Of course, it is impossible to teach the entire story of humankind and all historical perspectives, but learning more about the people who lived in times and places –some incredibly different from what we know- and who acted, reacted, and felt in completely human ways can lead to more understanding and empathy.  And there is no better time to develop them than when you’re young.

Below are just a few children’s and YA books featuring stories about those who once lived and who probably won’t make it into the usual history diet.  Included also are a few historical fiction stories based on true people, situations, and events.  This list has an emphasis on black historical figures as it is currently Black History Month.

covers of the first 4 books on the list

Come all you brave soldiers : Blacks in the Revolutionary War by Clinton Cox.  About the soldiers who fought for independence from England.

The Day of the Pelican by Katherine Paterson.  In 1998 when the Kosovo hostilities escalate, an ethnic Albanian girl and her family flee for their lives and make their way to the US, where they encounter new challenges.

Genius of Islam: How Muslims Made the Modern World by Bryn Barnard.  How Islam and Muslims played an essential role in the development of the modern world.

Inside out & Back Again by Thanhha LaiA young girl and her family leave Vietnam after the Fall of Saigon and resettle in Alabama.

covers of the next 4 books on the list

Landed by Milly Lee ; pictures by Yangsook Choi.  A fictional story based on the true experiences of the immigration process for young Chinese boys who come to the United States via San Francisco’s Angel Island in the early 20th century. 

Liberty or Death: The Surprising Story of Runaway Slaves Who Sided with the British During the American Revolution  by Margaret Whitman Blair.  About the black men who sided with the British who had promised freedom in exchange.

A Long Walk to Water by Linda Sue Park.  Based on the life of Salva Dut, a Sudanese refugee who led hundreds of boys to the Kakuma refugee camp in Kenya during the second Sudanese civil war.

My Brother’s Keeper by Israel Bernbaum.  Bernbaum, a Holocaust survivor, describes the horrors of the Holocaust through art.

covers of next 4 books on list

Run, Boy, Run : A Novel by Uri Orlev.  A nine-year-old Jewish orphan boy’s struggle to survive in Nazi-occupied Poland, based on a true story. 

She Loved Baseball : the Effa Manley Story by Audrey Vernick; illustrated by Don Tate. She owned a baseball team and was the first and only woman to be inducted to the baseball hall of fame.

Sylvia and Aki by Winifred Conkling.  Set at the beginning of WWII, the story of two girls – a Japanese-American girl sent to a Japanese internment camp and a Mexican-American girl at the center of a real life landmark desegregation case.

Voice of Freedom : Fannie Lou Hamer, Spirit of the Civil Rights Movement  by Carole Boston Weatherford ; illustrated by Ekua Holmes.  A voting rights activist who fought for and protected the voting rights of African Americans and helped many register to vote.

book cover images of next 5 books in list.

Welcome to Josefina’s World, 1824 : Growing up on America’s Southwest Frontier by Yvette LaPierre.  Part of the American Girl series of books and one of several books featuring the heroine, Josefina Montoya.  It provides an overview of how Mexican Americans lived in the 1820s – their daily lives, activities, and culture.  We hold

We’ve Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children’s March.  About the 4000 black children who marched for civil rights and demonstrated in non-violent protest.  The violent reactions of the police officers spurred the government to take action in desegregate Birmingham and to outlaw discrimination on the basis of race.

The Winter People by Joseph Bruchac.  Set during the French and Indian War, an Abenaki boy’a journey to rescue his mother and sisters, who were kidnapped by the English during a raid.

X : A Novel by Ilyasah Shabazz with Kekla Magoon.  Follows human rights activist, Malcolm X, from his childhood to age 20.

Year of Impossible Goodbyes by Sook Nyul Choi.  A young Korean girl and her family’s experiences during the Japanese and Russian occupations of North Korea in the 1940s and their escape to South Korea.

And a special shoutout to Frederick Douglass (inexplicably, some people seemed to be unsure about who Frederick Douglass was):

Frederick Douglass for Kids : his Life and Times with 21 Activities by Nancy Sanders.  An interactive biography of Frederick Douglass, former slave, abolitionist, and human rights activist.

cover of Frederick Douglass for Kids book


Read Across America is Back Again!

The Cat in the Hat is back again and so is Read Across America.  Read Across America, celebrated on Dr.Seuss’s birthday, is a nationwide event to recognize the importance of reading in the lives of young children.  For many of us, Dr.Seuss’s books played a huge role in our literacy development.  While I personally don’t remember reading Seuss as a child, its characters have popped in and out throughout my entire life.

At Wheelock, we’re holding the event a little early this year on Monday, February 27, at the Campus Center.  This will be our 8th annual celebration!  Please stop by and join us at any or all of our events:

10:30am – 11:30am: Story hour in the Wolf Room:
Volunteer to read a book to kids from a local preschool.  We will have both seuss and non-seuss selections.  We’re still looking for volunteers.  Please email lchoy@wheelock.edu to sign up!  If you’re feeling a little shy, you can pair up with a friend to read.

10am-12pm: Photo Booth:
Take some wacky seusstastical photos to share with friends.  #wheeread #readacrossamerica

All-Day Seuss Menu:
Dining services will be serving items inspired by dr. Seuss stories.  Dr. Seuss coloring pages will be available during lunch.

Book Drive for the Mattahunt Elementary School
Please bring in new or like new children’s books for 3rd-4th grade level readers to donate during our story hour. Donation boxes will also be available the entire month of march.   If you bring in a book, you’ll get a Seuss goody bag.  Sponsored by the Community Service and Civic Engagement Advisory Council.

Read Across America event poster - find text below

 

 

 


Its Library Lovers’ Month

Three reasons to be a library lover:

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Libraries provide access to information, technology, resources, space, the internet, museums, the list goes on and on.

Past, present, and future are brought together

In addition to books and articles which provide an intellectual link between past and future, many libraries also provide physical connections to the past in the form of archival collections and spaces to create and reach for the future in the form of makerspaces.

Librarians!

Okay, so as a librarian/archivist myself, perhaps I am a little bias here. That being said, librarians are awesome! Librarians are one of the best resources available libraries, they are your guides to the multitude resources available.

Why are you a library lover?