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Preservation Week: Save Your Stuff and Pass It On!

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It’s Preservation Week!

But what is Preservation Week, you might ask?

Preservation Week is a week long event sponsored by the American Library Association (ALA) in collaboration with partners such as the Library of Congress, The Society of American Archivists, and The Institute of Library and Museum Services among others; to inspire preservation action and education throughout the country. What is particularly special about Preservation Week is that it not only targets the preservation of collections held by libraries, archives, museums, and other cultural heritage institutions, but also everyone’s personal and family collections of books, photographs, letters, etc.

Learn more and get tips for preserving your own collections:

PreservationTips

 

 

* Saving your stuff:

Quick tips for caring for audio, books, film & home movies, data, textiles, documents & papers, slides, photographs, scrapbooks, oral histories, and artifacts.

 

* Dear Donia. . .

Ask Donia Conn, preservation specialist, your preservation questions and read her answers to question posed by others.

 

* Free Preservation Webinars

View free webinars on a number of preservation topics such as; preserving your digital memories, preserving your family photographs, and personal digital archiving.

 

 

 

 

 

 

To learn more check out the Preservation Week website.

 


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Extended Hours Have Begun!

The Wheelock College Library has extended its hours through the end of the semester to help you stay productive through those late night study sessions!

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Need some research help? Come to the service desk for drop-in research help any time during extended hours.

The library also has fun activities to help you relax during the stress of finals. Take some time out from studying to work on a puzzle, located near the service desk. Get in touch with your creative side with our adult coloring stations (located on floors 1, 1M, 2M, 3, and 4).

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Student Worker Week 2016

Student Employment Week 2016

Student Worker Week 2016Student Employment Week is April 11 through April 15 and serves as a worthy reminder of just how much we owe our amazing, talented, and dedicated student workers without whom the Library could not be open the 95.5 hours it is each week during the semester.

Each academic year, the Library employs an average of 24 student workers eligible for work-study. These workers have the important job of serving as the “face” of the Library, as they literally are the first people seen when students, faculty, and staff enter the building.

After undergoing a three part training, these workers are fully prepared to provide friendly, professional service by locating items, checking out materials, answering questions about spaces and services housed in the Library, and making educated referrals.

Whether it is early morning, afternoon, evening, weekday, or weekend, you can usually find one of our exceptional student workers below at the desk ready and willing to assist you.

Alyssa Halpin
Arianna Saunders
Ashley Wight
Christine Zamor
Claudia Barnard
Claudia Cabrera
Courtney Stage
Danielle Horan
Eric Clark
Gleidymar Rivera
Guerslande Etienne
Kailani Massaquoi
Kaleigh Carrington
Khilah Boone
Kirsten Robinson
Kiara Valentin
Mia Mendoza
Musshda Haq
Nicole Cure
Nicole Shine*
Orianna Natsis*
Raynna Walsh-Sormanti
Sarah Richards
Sarah Taylor
Shaila Vaden
Vlashandra Olivier

On behalf of the entire Library staff I would like to thank each of these students for their regular contributions to the Library!

*Both Orianna and Nicole were named Wheelock College Student Employees of the Year!  Congratulations to both!


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Wheelock Library Celebrates National Poetry Month

April marks the 20th anniversary of National Poetry Month.  The Wheelock College Library is celebrating this milestone occasion in several different ways.

Stop by the library any time in the month of April to check out our New England Poets Display celebrating the work of poets living in or inspired by New England. Get lost in the nature and landscapes of New England while reading evocative prose by Robert Frost. Ponder the human condition with works by Ralph Waldo Emerson, one of the founders of the transcendentalist movement. Everything in the display case can be checked out of the library. To take a closer look at something, ask a library staff member for assistance. You can also browse many more books in our poetry section (call number 811) on floor 4M of the library.

disp_fullGet in touch with your creative side and partake in our Poetry Tree activity. Create your own blackout poem from one of the old book page leaves, or cut out words from an old newspaper to create a poem on a blank leaf. Share it with the Wheelock community by hanging it on our Poetry Tree or take it home to hang in your room. This activity will also be set up for the entire month of April.
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There are lots of additional resources on the American Academy of Poets website. For example, April 21st is Poem in your Pocket Day. Learn more about this event here. The American Academy of Poets also provides this handy PFD list of poems for your pocket. The Wheelock Library will have printouts of a selection of these poems available at the service desk on April 21st if you want to stop by and pick one up.

Finally make sure to go to Boston’s National Poetry Month Festival (April 7th – 10th at the Boston Public Library and Northeastern University). You can hear readings by famous poets, attend the 2nd Annual High School Poetry Slam competition, or show off your own skills at Open Mic events.


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Oral History: Collecting the Voices and Perspectives of History

The best history is complex, and told using many voices and many perspectives. Historians have a wide range of source types available to them which they can use in their research. Oral Histories are one type of source that a historian might consult as they seek to produce a rich and complex account of the past.

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To learn more about what constitutes an oral history and the development of the field of oral history, check out the essay “What Is Oral History?” by Linda Shopes. The essay is part of a larger resource, “History Matters“, a collaboration between the American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning of the City University of New York and the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University, “History Matters” is designed to be a resource for history teachers (at both the high school and college levels), as well as students enrolled in U.S. History survey courses.

Interested in learning more about the process of collecting oral history interviews? Check out the Oral History Associations page of Principles and Best Practices.

If you are interested in the applications of oral history projects outside of the traditional field of history check out Upending the Narrative of the Great Man of History by Eliza Griswold, published in Smithsonian Magazine in December 2013.

Looking to listen to oral histories? Check out this sampling of online oral history collections:

StoryCorps

 A independently funded, 501(c)(3) organization which launched a large scale oral history collection and preservation project in 2003. Learn more about StoryCorps through their FAQ page, or listen to their online collection of oral histories.

American Life Histories: Manuscripts from the Federal Writers’ Project, 1936 to 1940

This collection of over 2,900 documents, which includes oral histories and transcripts was made possible through the work carried out by the Federal Writers’ Project, part of the New Deal’s  Works Progress Administration / Work Projects Administration. Explore the collection online through the Library of Congress.

Oral Histories of the American South

A collection of 500 oral history interviews about the American South. The 500 interviews available online are part of a larger collection of 4,000 interviews housed at the Southern Historical Collection at University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill.

Oral History of the House

This collection focuses on the people, events, institutions, and objects of the ever-evolving House of Representatives of the United States. Learn about the collection and listen to the interviews here.

Oral History Center, Bancroft Library; University of California Berkeley

Want to learn more about the Oral History Center and its collections? Click here. Want to search their collection of oral histories? Check out their search tools (you can either search the collection through a keyword search or use their list of subject areas ).