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Louisa Choy

Read Across America is Back Again!

The Cat in the Hat is back again and so is Read Across America.  Read Across America, celebrated on Dr.Seuss’s birthday, is a nationwide event to recognize the importance of reading in the lives of young children.  For many of us, Dr.Seuss’s books played a huge role in our literacy development.  While I personally don’t remember reading Seuss as a child, its characters have popped in and out throughout my entire life.

At Wheelock, we’re holding the event a little early this year on Monday, February 27, at the Campus Center.  This will be our 8th annual celebration!  Please stop by and join us at any or all of our events:

10:30am – 11:30am: Story hour in the Wolf Room:
Volunteer to read a book to kids from a local preschool.  We will have both seuss and non-seuss selections.  We’re still looking for volunteers.  Please email lchoy@wheelock.edu to sign up!  If you’re feeling a little shy, you can pair up with a friend to read.

10am-12pm: Photo Booth:
Take some wacky seusstastical photos to share with friends.  #wheeread #readacrossamerica

All-Day Seuss Menu:
Dining services will be serving items inspired by dr. Seuss stories.  Dr. Seuss coloring pages will be available during lunch.

Book Drive for the Mattahunt Elementary School
Please bring in new or like new children’s books for 3rd-4th grade level readers to donate during our story hour. Donation boxes will also be available the entire month of march.   If you bring in a book, you’ll get a Seuss goody bag.  Sponsored by the Community Service and Civic Engagement Advisory Council.

Read Across America event poster - find text below

 

 

 


A Celebration of Reading: The Boston Book Festival and 1C1S

Boston Book Festival is an annual celebration that “promotes a culture of reading and ideas and enhances the vibrancy of our city”[1] and it is being held on Saturday, October 15 in Copley Square.   Most events are free and first-come, first-served.  However, some workshops do require advance registration.

The Boston Book Festival will feature dozens of exhibitors, along with over 200 speakers and presenters, including novelists, journalists, critics, essayists, poets, scholars, and artists.   The organizers have color-coded the events in the schedule to help identify the type of interests for which audiences the event would have the most appeal.

Each year, the Boston Book Festival also organizes the One City One Story (1C1S) program – providing one short story to the entire city free of charge to create a shared reading experience for Boston residents and to foster discussions and engagement in reading. cover image of the One City One Story short story. One City One Story is in caps and below it is the title of the story and its author. The selection this year is “The Faery Handbag” by Kelly Link.   Copies of the story are available for free at the Wheelock College Library on top of the Book Exchange Shelf by the Service Desk.  You can also download the story from the One City One Story website.  The digital copies are offered in English, Spanish, and Russian at the moment.  Additional translations should be coming soon.

On the day of the Boston Book Festival, there will be a 1C1S Town Hall in the forum space at Trinity Church, where you can discuss the story with fellow readers across the city.

[1]https://bostonbookfest.org/about-us/


screenshot of search box with Course Reserves highlighted

Is This Book on Reserve for My Class?

Welcome back!  Over the summer, we’ve implemented a new, more user-friendly interface for searching items your professors have requested that we put on reserve.   You can access it by going to the Library homepage and clicking on the Course Reserves link in the search box.

screenshot of search box with Course Reserves highlighted

On the next screen, search by any of the following keywords:  professor’s first name, professor’s last name, item title, item author, course code, and course name.  In the below example, I searched for Claire.

screenshot of reserves search field

The results page will show a list of course reserves lists in which the keyword, Claire, appears.

Once you select the course you’re taking, you will see a list of items on reserve for that course.

list of items on reserve for CLF210

Click on the item you’re interested in and you will find the call number and availability.  You can bring that call number to the Library Service Desk and we will retrieve the item for you from our Course Reserves shelves.

screenshot of reserves holdings info

This allows a level of DIY-ness in finding out what we have on reserve and we hope this will make the process of tracking down and accessing course readings easier and more efficient.  Please do reach out to us if you have questions!


Screenshot of ejournal finder search results, with the Search within Publication highlighted

New eJournal Finder and a Google Scholar update

The Library has a new and enhanced eJournal Finder!  If you haven’t used the eJournal Finder before, it is a tool that helps you find Wheelock subscriptions to journals and the articles within them.  The new Finder looks a little different, but the functionality will remain very familiar, with additional improvements over the previous one.   You can access it through the Library homepage by going to the eJournal Finder tab.

screenshot of ejournal finder tab

Try searching for Journal of Social Work Education.  In your Search Results, you can go to one of the databases where full text is available for this journal.  For many of the journals, you can search within that journal.

Screenshot of ejournal finder search results, with the Search within Publication highlighted

The Search within Publication  feature is incredibly handy.  You can put in something as general as the term, “elementary schools” to find Journal of Social Work Education articles related to “elementary schools”.   You can also search for a specific article title, like “MSW students’ attitudes toward transracial adoption”.  This saves you several steps over the previous eJournal finder.  Here is what you will immediately get when you run this second search:

results from an article title search using the eJournal Finder's Search Within Publication feature. Two results.

This new eJournal Finder means you will also have to update your Google Scholar library links.  For those who don’t know what Google Scholar’s library links do: it finds full text from Wheelock subscriptions in your Google Scholar results.

first Google Scholar search results

Go to scholar.google.com and select Settings.

Google Scholar homepage with a red box around the Settings link

On the next page, select Library Links.

 

Google scholar settings page with Library Links highlighted

Under Library Links, search for Wheelock.  Select everything that says Wheelock.

Google Scholar library links page with all 4 current options selected

Please let us know if you have questions!  You can come see us, email us at library@wheelock.edu, call us at 617-879-2220, or chat us via the Library website.

 


americanbornchinese

Graphic Novels Are Books, Too!

A few weeks ago, I told a few teenagers, who had expressed disinterest in reading, that graphic novels are books, too.   I mean, you have to read them to understand the story, though not in the same way that you would traditionally think about reading.  Part of the experience of reading isn’t just reading the words.  Sure, words are important.  Bad writing can lead to disinterest and frustration; and beautiful writing can elevate the reading experience.  However, there is a something else going on as you process the words on the page – you’re discovering the narrative, analyzing character motivations, and becoming emotionally involved.

Image of a young woman reading a book on a chair. Text: Book hangover: Inability to start a new book because you're still living in the last book's worldGraphic novels have fewer words, but the words they do have  – often in the form of thought and speech bubbles – are important in developing the story and giving insight into the characters.   The artwork, including decisions on how to organize and frame the panels, informs mood and emotions that must be interpreted through a different sort of process – a visual one that “reads” the images.

In the past 10 years, I’ve seen an explosion in the popularity, variety, and availability of graphic novels in the US.  Rather than a genre, it has become more of a format and a more widely acceptable one at that.  Graphic novels used to take up about half a shelf in bookstores and in public libraries; now there are multiple bookcases worth in these places.  Graphic novels have helped reluctant readers to more positively engage with reading and develop literacy skills.  They have also become a teaching tool in the classroom.

Shelves of graphic novels

Photo by Morebyless (CC BY 2.0)

Here are some graphic novels available at Wheelock:

American Born Chinese by Gene Luen Yang ; color by Lark Pien. Three stories about the problems of young Chinese Americans.

A + E 4ever : A Graphic Novel by I. Merey. Coming of age story about two lonely gender non-conforming teens who meet and form a friendship.

Monster by Walter Dean Myers.  A story of a teenage boy on trial for his supposed role as lookout in a murder.

Rapunzel’s revenge by Shannon Hale and Dean Hale ; illustrated by Nathan Hale.  In this Old West retelling, Rapunzel saves herself and gets of out sticky situations using her hair as a lasso.

Roller Girl by Victoria Jamieson.  Story of a young girl who signs up for roller derby camp and is struggling with spending the summer apart from her best friend.

Images of 5 book covers. From L to R: 1. a boy and girl sleeping facing each other 2. a lone young black teenager 3. a chinese boy with a robot 4. A boy and a girl with very long hair 5. A girl with blue hair on skates

Looking for more?  A fan of English-translated Japanese graphic novels like I am?  The Wheelock community has access to the Boston Public Library and its many branches and to the Brookline Public Library.  Just bring in your Wheelock ID and they will hook you up.  I recommend Attack on Titan by Hajime Isayama for those interested in bleak yet compelling post-apocalyptic stories and Fruits Basket by Natsuki Takaya for lighter fare.
Cover of the first volume of Fruits Basket. Cover features a high school girl with long brown hair surrounding by orbs containing the 12 animals of the Chinese zodiac

For those interested in how graphic novels work in the classroom, check out our blog post from 4 years ago and the below books:

An cover image inspired by Superman; a man peeling open his white shirt to reveal the words, "The Graphic Novel Classroom".

The Graphic Novel Classroom POWerful Teaching and Learning with Images. Available online at Wheelock.

Image of a teacher standing in front of a blackboard pointing a stick to the dialogue box: Class, Please Open your Comics

Class, Please Open Your Comics : Essays on Teaching with Graphic Narratives / Edited by Matthew L. Miller. Available online at Wheelock