What’s on Your Summer Reading List?

Back in May, we asked our Library visitors, “What’s on your ‘summer reading’ list? (for school or for fun)”?  And we had a lot of suggestions (and suggestions about those suggestions)!

summerreadsI’ve found several of the titles available at the Library.  If you’re around for the summer, come check them out.  And if you’re not around, then stop by during the fall.  Reading for fun is a great way to relieve stress!

The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho (813 C64a) :  This book serves as both a story of a young shepherd boy who travels the Egypt in search of the treasure in his dreams, and a philosophy on how one could live one’s life by following dreams and watching out for signs.  It’s about dreaming big and enjoying the journey, not the destination.  It is often on people’s list of books that changed their lives.

bookrow1 A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court by Mark Twain (available on ebook and in print): A 19th century man awakens in 6th Century England and proceeds to use his knowledge of history and technological inventions to improve and modern the lives around him.

The Fault in Our Stars by John Green (J G817f): The story of 16 year old cancer patient Hazel, and how she meets and falls in love with a boy named, Augustus Waters.  It is a surprisingly simple premise that has won the hearts and tears of its readers with its intelligent and vibrant characters.  The movie is now in theaters!

The Giver (J L95g): Jonas becomes the Receiver of Memories, taking in all the memories of his community’s past.  He realizes that the Sameness adopted by his community needs to end in order to restore happiness and the power of choice, and, with the Giver’s help, plots his escape.  The movie adaptation of this novel is coming out this summer.  Read the book before you watch it.

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The Great Gatsby (available on ebook and in print):  While the main narrative is about a wealthy and enigmatic man named Jay Gatsby and his love for his former flame, socialite Daisy Buchanan, the book is really about the sense of possibility and the display of decadence of the early 1920s.  It’s a lot more enjoyable when you’re not reading it for school.

The Hatchet by Gary Paulsen (J P28h): After a plane crash, Brian is stranded in the wilderness and must survive on his own with nothing but his hatchet.

The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkein(823 T57zg): The titular hobbit, Bilbo Baggins, who loves staying at home and staying out of trouble, finds himself on a quest with a band of dwarves to sneak into the Lonely Mountain and retrieve a royal jewel from the dragon, Smaug.

Hop on Pop by Dr.Seuss(J-P Se9ho): There isn’t much of a story here (or maybe I’m just not seeing it), but the rhymes are fun.

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Orange it the New Black: My Year in a Women’s Prison by Piper Kerman (365.43 K47o):  Piper recounts the 15 months she had spent in prison  – the codes of behavior, the failures of the prison system, and the incredible lives of the women around her.  The second season of the TV adaptation of the memoir is now available on Netflix for binge-watching.

Tuesdays with Morrie: An Old Man, a Young Man, and Life’s Greatest Lesson by Mitch Albom (378.12 AL1t): A memoir chronicling 14 Tuesdays Mitch Albom spent with his former sociology professor, Morrie Schwartz, and the life lessons the older man imparted to his former pupil.  It is another one of those books that can change people’s outlook on life.

There were a few that weren’t in the Library, so we ordered them.  In the coming months, be on the lookout for Paper Towns by John Green, Divergent by Veronica Roth, and The Book Thief by Markus Zusak, along with other popular reading titles.

So what’s on your summer reading list?  Personally, I’m planning to tackle Insurgent by Veronica Roth this coming week and thinking about revisiting Crime and Punishment (891.73 D74ca) by Fyodor Dostoyevsky.

 

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